Boating Saftey

Pool Saftey

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Helpful Tips

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The American College of Emergency Physicians recommends these safety tips to keep you on the water and out of the emergency room:


Before engaging in any water sport, tell someone when you're going out, who's with you, and how long you'll be away.

Check your boat, equipment, engine, and fuel supply before leaving the dock. Before starting your engine, open hatches, run the blower, and most importantly, sniff for gasoline fumes in the fuel and engine area.

When changing seats, stay low and near the center line of a small boat. Wear Coast Guard-approved life jackets.

Watch the weather. Sudden wind shifts, light flashes, and choppy water can mean a storm is brewing.

Never drink alcoholic beverages on ship. Tipsiness can lead to falling overboard and impair your ability to swim or call for help.

 


Drowning is the second leading cause of injury-related deaths of children 14 and under. Two-thirds of the nearly 1,100 incidents that occurred in 1996 took place between May and August--pool season in many areas of the country.

Among children four and under, there are some 500 residential swimming pool drowning and 3,000 near-drowning each year. Half occur in the child's home pool and a third at homes of friends or relatives. In-ground swimming pools without enclosed fencing are 60 percent more likely to be involved in drowning than those with four-sided fences. The National SAFE KIDS Campaign recommends the installation of pool fencing that's at least five feet high and equipped with self-closing, self-latching gates.

Door alarms, pool alarms, and automatic pool covers, when used correctly, add extra protection.

Never leave a child unsupervised in or around a swimming pool, the Campaign warns. And don't rely on flotation devices or swimming lessons to protect a child. Pool owners and their guests should learn CPR and keep rescue equipment and emergency telephone numbers poolside. The American College of Emergency Physicians recommends these safety tips to keep you on the water and out of the emergency room:

Before engaging in any water sport, tell someone when you're going out, who's with you, and how long you'll be away.

Check your boat, equipment, engine, and fuel supply before leaving the dock. Before starting your engine, open hatches, run the blower, and most importantly, sniff for gasoline fumes in the fuel and engine area.

When changing seats, stay low and near the center line of a small boat. Wear Coast Guard-approved life jackets.

Watch the weather. Sudden wind shifts, light flashes, and choppy water can mean a storm is brewing.

Never drink alcoholic beverages on ship. Tipsiness can lead to falling overboard and impair your ability to swim or call for help.